Not All Spanish Speakers Understand ASL

The big problem I now have with Spanish is that I’m so used to hearing it along with ASL (because our deaf friends from the LDS Deaf Branch we attend are mostly Mexican and speak Spanish while signing in ASL) that when I try to explain myself to someone who speaks Spanish (primarily) I end up signing to them as if they also understand ASL, so they’ll understand me better.

I did it again today.  The tree guy came to give us an estimate on our trimming.  And as I was trying to explain our other needs and wants, he gave me the ‘look’ that says “I’m not quite understanding you.”  So what did I do? I started signing.

It only took me a moment (and his odd look at me) to realize what I was doing, and speak what little Spanish I can remember (I grew up around Spanish speakers in my extended family) to clarify.  It’s such a habit now, I find myself doing it all the time, without even realizing it.

 

Spanglish

When I married my half-deaf/half-blind/half-crazy husband I knew exactly one word and one phrase in ASL. The word? Sorry. The phrase? I love you. We started to go to a deaf branch of the LDS church the week after we were married. It was the people in the branch that taught me ASL, the interpreters and the members. Because most of the members were Hispanic, and I am half Hispanic, more comfortable with Spanish than I was with ASL, I hung around the Hispanic deaf members because I felt a little more comfortable in their culture than Deaf Culture. The words they verbalized were often in Spanish, the food was Mexican and even if it was quiet, it was familiar. But from those friends I picked up a lot of words in MSL not knowing they were MSL.

Now that I am more comfortable with my skills in sign language, I sometimes find that I’ve learned a word in MSL that translates as a completely different word in ASL. Strawberry in MSL, for instance, looks a lot like Flower in ASL and it is easy to confuse my ASL only friends with the sign.

The strangest side effect of this, however, has nothing to do with the deaf. Because I am (1/2) Hispanic, I have friends that speak very little English and I find myself signing at them when I am trying to stammer out my broken, ill-used, Spanish. Maybe it’s because ASL and Spanish are in the same part of my brain, I don’t know, but it must look awfully strange to my hearing friends and relatives to see me waving my hands in the air while I am speaking to them.

It’s kinda funny because my hearing friends do the opposite to me, knowing I speak ASL at home. They try NOT to wave their hands about, because they’ve seen me zero in on their hands once they start moving, like I’m trying to figure out what signs they are signing.

Being multilingual in a multilingual world would be a fascinating study in anthropology or linguistics, don’t you think?